Well, its bit old actually, but it is still good:blog

Safety is a product, not a process.

It is being said in the industrial accident context. I’ll let the Ranter explain! through his blog.

In general, effective safety measures are usually something you do, and scattering costly “devices” around an unchanged process is a classic failure mode. Not least because they might instil a false sense of safety and lead people to take risks…

Accidents cost money, in the same way that quality failures cost money. At the very least, in the most cynical 19th century Yorkshire mill-owner’s view, they cause downtime, quality problems, and damage to expensive equipment. In a less cynical and more general sense, accidents are just one of the sources of excessive variability in the production process, like late change requests, tools whose tolerances are too large, or a virus outbreak among the Windows boxen. If accidents are happening, this is a symptom of problems with the process.
Reworking production processes to eliminate the sources of variability is precisely what industrial managers are meant to do all day.

In other words, risk management is not an overlay, it is what you should be doing all the time.

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