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Tag Archive: Bank for International Settlements


Very recently CME shared a paper on the famous OTC derivatives and their treatment under Extraterritoriality. Due to the role of imagesunregulated over-the-counter (OTC) financial derivatives in the 2008 financial crisis which began in the U.S. but whose influence was felt globally, the G-20 agreed in its Pittsburgh meeting in 2009 that “all standardised OTC derivative contracts should be traded on exchanges or electronic trading platforms, where appropriate, and cleared through central counterparties by end-2012, at the latest. OTC derivative contracts should be reported to trade repositories. Non-centrally cleared contracts should be subject to higher capital requirements.”  Continue reading

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The recent crisis as lead to unexpected results, Here is what I feel the most unusual lessons…gm_00411 Darwin, Northern Territory Painting 1983

Lesson #1 Government agencies allocate capital better than the private sector
Lesson #2 Central banks should control asset prices and prevent them from falling
Lesson #3 Darwin & Schumpeter were wrong, creationists are right; there is such a thing as a free lunch
Lesson #4 Towards a new orthopraxy
Lesson #5 Wondrous tools used by the clergy to grow GDP
Lesson #6 How to finance infinite needs……

Yesterday CME shared a paper on the famous OTC derivatives and their treatment under Extraterritoriality. Due to the Arole of unregulated over-the-counter (OTC) financial derivatives in the 2008 financial crisis which began in the U.S. but whose influence was felt globally, the G-20 agreed in its Pittsburgh meeting in 2009 that “all standardised OTC derivative contracts should be traded on exchanges or electronic trading platforms, where appropriate, and cleared through central counterparties by end-2012, at the latest. OTC derivative contracts should be reported to trade repositories. Non-centrally cleared contracts should be subject to higher capital requirements.”

The members of the G-20, in varying degrees and at different speeds, have embarked in their own jurisdictions to reform the OTC derivatives market. Given the interconnected nature of these markets, international cooperation has very much been part of crafting derivatives financial regulation.
Continue reading

At the annual general meeting of the International Swaps and Derivatives Association in Singapore concluded

June's multi-colored eyes

yesterday,a group of panelists highlighted the lack of clarity over resolution for failed Central counterparty (CCPs) as a significant concern for the G20 objectives of eliminating systemic risk.

Central counterparty clearers stand to be the next “too-big-to-fail” institutions and could pose an acute threat to the
financial system if regulators stall on plans to manage the potential failure of a clearing entity.

There are two main processes that are carried out by CCPs: Continue reading

How Big is OTC

Jon, posting at the OTC space, does a nice job of setting out the size of various markets. In particular he uses gross

Westminster and Big Ben in Gold

market value rather than notional for OTCs, which is a (much) more useful measure. The results are interesting:

Scarcely a day goes by without a press article or speech mentioning in its introduction the “more $600+ trillion OTC derivatives market”. Whilst this may liven up the subject, this unnecessarily inflames concern. Here’s why.

What are the figures? The quoted figures come from the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) half yearly reporting on OTC derivatives market activity – published on their website. The latest is: BIS OTC 2012 H1 which notes $639 trillion open notional. Continue reading

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