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Tag Archive: Berkshire Hathaway


What the wise man does in the beginning, the fool does in the end – Shares in the Berkshire Hathaway Textile blogCompany could be had for around $7.50 when Mr. Buffett first started buying the stock for himself and his partners. It closed at $214,400 April 29th 2015. That’s an increase in excess of 2,850,000%. What a man and his vision:

Here are seven interesting things I learned about Warren Buffett from The Snowball, and some ideas on how they can help you’re investing:

  1. Buffett set goals young. (He really started, really young)
    Buffet began obsessing over numbers as a child. He raced marbles with a stopwatch and calculated the lifespan of hymn composers when six-years old. He sold chewing gum at seven and Coca Cola when he was eight: the same year he began wearing a money-changer on his belt.

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Was reading an interview Warren Buffett on Bloomberg :

with Warren Buffett

WARREN BUFFETT: Well I came up with that a long, long time ago to describe the situation that – I was lucky. I was born in the United States. The odds were 30 or 40-to-1 against that. I had some lucky genes. I was born at the right time. If I’d been born thousands of years ago I’d be some animal’s lunch because I can’t run very fast or climb trees. So there’s so much chance in how we enter the world.

LIU: And you were always aware to make sure your children and their grandchildren, and your grandchildren would be grounded.  Continue reading

History shows that mutual fund investors generally increase inflows after observing periods of strong performance. They

Beach PL - Generation Gap

buy at high prices when future expected returns are lower, and they sell after observing periods of poor performance when future expected returns are now higher.

This results in what author Carl Richards called the “behavior gap,” in which investor returns are well below the returns of the funds in which they invest. Perhaps with this observation in mind, Warren Buffett once said, “The most important quality for an investor is temperament, not intellect.”  Continue reading

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