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Tag Archive: CAPITAL ADEQUACY


Equity investing is something that can’t be taught or learned in a limited period.  It requires time, patience and rules blogthat you can bank on. I shared few principles from the famous book Beating the Street by Peter Lynch few days back. At the end of the book Lynch shared 25 Golden Rules of investing:   (Which is interesting because I count 26)

  1. Investing is fun, exciting, and dangerous if you don’t do any work.
  2. Your investor’s edge is not something you get from Wall Street experts. It’s something you already have. You can outperform the experts if you use your edge by investing in companies or industries you already understand. Continue reading
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As I did a story few days back  When to sell and When to buy ?     Trying to recollect the some book rules blogfor Investments that holds true in many adverse scenarios.

As all of you must be aware of that the field of behavioral finance has helped us to understand that we don’t always make rational investment decisions.We often make poor decisions because of our biases. And the designers of structured product are well aware of these “flaws” in investor behaviour. So they structure products that exploit our flaws. Continue reading

How MF GLOBAL Failed

Not many people know about the convictions behind how MF global failed. This is how the destruction process works @ Wall Street and MF Global bankruptcy was one of the example of it.

They were very bad in Europe; leveraged 33:1 so there is no space of error when the firm is leveraged like that.

The three lessons that are can be shared from MF Global’s death:

  • Accounting loopholes have to be closed and oversight improved.
  • Non-bank financial firms should have a lead regulator.
  •  Rule-writers should consider “non-systemic” firms as well as “too big    to fail” banks.

But there is a contrast view to it:

More regulation, more rules, Dodd Frank/EMIR/FATCA  and to no purpose at all.

A banker wants to bet his firm on the direction of sovereign debt. If successful, we call him Soros and pat in him on the back. And if not, the firm is closed down. Regulations were pointless, because no rule book can reign in human ingenuity. Continue reading

September 15 2008 was one of the most extraordinary days in global financial history.A simmering credit crisis exploded into a full-blown apocalypse in the global financial sector when Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy.  

With assets of $639bn and a further $613bn of debts, it was the biggest corporate bankruptcy in the US. The collapse of Lehman had immediate repercussions, frightening financial markets around the world, but with hindsight its demise has come to embody the failure of investment banks to adequately assess risk and invest accordingly.

Market Performance (from the close before Lehman BK) – Silver +71%, Gold +61%, S&P +58% ( For S&P the dividend are not accounted for. Including dividend it will be close to 88%)

Here is a must watch documentary of 60 min : “The West is done, it’s over! We screwed it all up. Do you want your great-grandchildren speaking Chinese 🙂

Whenever the financial crisis happen the concept of bad banks becomes common. In 2009 during the sub-prime crisis so called blogLehman crisis the concept of bad banks was very famous.

As per the information from Bloomberg:

The Bank of Portugal unveiled a 4.9 billion-euro ($6.6 billion) bailout over the weekend that will leave shareholders and junior bondholders with losses, while sparing senior creditors and unsecured depositors. Banco Espirito Santo, once the country’s largest lender by market value, will be split in two, with depositors and healthy assets joining the newly formed Novo Bank while bad loans and junior creditors stay with the old bank until it can be shut down.

“To regulators in Frankfurt and Brussels, this must have seemed the safest way to isolate any residual and tail risks” related to the bank’s Angolan unit and loans to other parts of the Espirito Santo group, Citigroup Inc.
Continue reading

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