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Tag Archive: United States


Who is a Rogue trader? Every one of us has a rogue in us. Trading is such a profession where the set rules procedures are not blogfollowed if you are making money for the firm. It would not be harsh to define rogue trader as a lone-wolves, because they are being covered by the rogue managers.

But, even lone-wolves belong to a group. They just prefer to avoid the assistance of others in certain matters. The rogue trader’s pack is the howling, fierce management for which he works. Lone-wolves always have alpha members they take orders from, don’t they? Lone-wolves are sometimes excluded from the pack to protect that alpha-male, thus preventing ‘in-breeding’ in the pack. It’s exactly the same in the trading world of finance. The rogue trader is excluded from the pack, forced to work alone, shunned so that if caught, there will be no ‘inter-breeding’. The alpha-male manager won’t be caught and be brought down if the rogue falls!   Continue reading

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Financial Scandals

I thought of putting the Sahara case today vis-a vis the famous Bernard Madoff ponzi scheme scandal case … well the study is on, blogneed more data collection and actual reporting but Kudos to RBI and SEBI as they finally nailed out the Sahara Scandal case with the help of Supreme court.

Recollecting some of the scandals in the Investment banking space from The Barclays Saga and Libor , LIBOR    Manipulation : any thing for you Big Boyz , JP Morgan : Jamie Dimon Testimony and the series is endless ..I believe the quotes of the maverick author holds true :

  • The main difference between government bailouts and smoking is that in some rare cases the statement “This is my last cigarette “holds true
  • The difference between banks and Mafia: banks have better legal regulatory expertise,but Mafia understands the public opinion. Or you can say”Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank and he can rob the world”  Continue reading

In his first official act as the new governor of the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), Raghuram Rajan raised the benchmark interest rate blogfrom 7.25 to 7.5%, causing a ripple of surprise in financial circles and eliciting protests from various business representatives. But for people who know the current condition of emerging markets and Rajan’s professional trajectory, this was not surprising, at all.

Rajan has no qualms about staging such challenges. In 2005, Rajan was chief economist of the International Monetary Fund and attended the top central bankers’ get together in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, to present a paper on how the financial sector had evolved during Alan Greenspan’s era. As Rajan later described the meeting, which was to be Greenspan’s last, in his book Fault Lines: “Some of the papers in the conference, in keeping with the Greenspan-era theme, focused on whether Alan Greenspan was the best central banker in history, or just among the best.”  Continue reading

Economic commentators are disappointingly short on metaphors. New economic figures released last week prompted a slew of blogarticles asking whether or not India’s economy had “turned a corner,” “cleared the woods” or begun sprouting “green shoots.” After a turbulent summer – and against the backdrop of a lingering global downturn, looming general election and a booming China – it’s no surprise that Indians, and investors, are desperate for signs that the country’s economy is “back on track.”

As the global markets flopped at the end of last week under the repeated threat of the Federal Reserve removing its support for the US economy, one market decided to go the other way – IndiaContinue reading

When you read history, you tend to read about historical events, about numbers, dates, and data. But it was people who drove those blogevents, people making decisions on the basis of uncertain information, unknown consequences and frequently in the ‚fog of war. The opening quotation in Ahamed’s book is from Benjamin Disraeli: Read no history – nothing but biography, for that is life without theory. This perfectly sets the tone for what for me is one of the best treatments of the Great Depression I’ve ever read.

This account differs from others because it is told largely fromthe vantage points of the four central bankers of the four largest economies of the day: Benjamin Strong at the New York FedHjalmar Schacht of the German Reichbank, Montagu Norman of the Bank of England, and Emile Moreau of the Banque de France. Continue reading

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